TuneCore Social Pro Has Arrived!

Last October, we announced the exciting launch of TuneCore Social – an all-in-one platform designed especially for artists who want to reign in control of their Facebook, Twitter, Soundcloud and Mixcloud profiles and have an easier place to plan, schedule, publish and engage with their fan base. The service is free for any and all TuneCore Artist who currently has a release distributed with TuneCore.

Today, we’re thrilled to expand on those efforts and offer TuneCore Social Pro, an upgraded, premium version of TuneCore Social that allows users to schedule an unlimited amount of social posts per month (including media posts), add other artists to their account for social profile management, share social media reports, and access more comprehensive social media analytics, stats and audience insights.

The coolest part? TuneCore Social Pro includes a mobile app!

When an artist signs up for TuneCore Social Pro, they’ll be able to post or schedule posts to Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, check their TuneCore balance and trend reports – all from their mobile devices!

For $7.99/month (or a discounted annual fee of $85.99), TuneCore Artists can sign up for TuneCore Social Pro, download the app on their Android or iOS devices, and get a huge jump on managing their social media strategy.

TuneCore Social Pro is an all-in-one platform designed exclusively for TuneCore Artists who want to reign in control of their Facebook, Twitter, Soundcloud and Mixcloud profiles and have an easier place to plan, schedule, publish and engage with their fan base – not to mention have a high level view of important analytics that can impact decision making.

Offering a premium version of TuneCore Social is just another way we’re looking to make the lives and careers of independent artists easier. We know how important getting the word out about your music is and we’re always here to help by providing valuable tips and advice for doing so – now we’re giving you the social media management tools to take it one step further.

Liverpool Sound City

By Sam Taylor
May sees the start of the music festival and conference season for the UK – and TuneCore will be at a number of events throughout the month, including Liverpool Sound City.

Now in its tenth year, Liverpool Sound City’s award-winning festival brings together well known acts and emerging talent for four days over May 25th to May 28th. With previous years line-up featuring break-through performances from Catfish & The Bottlemen, Bastille and Royal Blood this year features acts from TuneCore artist Violet Contours, and TuneCore alumni The Hunna, Fickle Friends, Cabbage and others.

A core part of Liverpool Sound City is Sound City+, Liverpool Sound City’s new music conference, which presents great opportunities to learn more about the music business, learn from experts, and get one-on-one advice from industry professionals.

TuneCore will be in attendance – our UK Brand Manager Sam Taylor will be taking one on one meetings to give advice about digital distribution, release strategy, promotion and playlisting, as well as speaking about how artists can embrace technology to connect with fans.

We’ll also be out and about at the various networking events, parties and gigs across the four days, so please stop by the conference sessions to say hello, or book in for a one-on-one session with Sam using the form below.

The Sound City+ conference takes place at Camp & Furnace, in the heart of the Baltic Triangle, Liverpool’s creative hub. 67 Greenland Street, Liverpool, L1 0BY

If you’ve not already got your ticket for Liverpool Sound City you can access discounted prices through TuneCore.

A Conference + Festival pass is just £99.75 + booking fee

Click here to book.

A Conference only ticket is just £38 + booking fee

Click here to book.

Unfortunately this event is only for Sound City+ and ticket holders – but TuneCore will also be out and about across the UK at various events in April, May and June – check www.tunecore.co.uk/blueprint for more details.

TuneCore Presents Blueprint

TuneCore is coming to a town near you!

At TuneCore we know that one of the biggest challenges as an independent musician is to know where to turn for advice at different stages of your career – and often it seems like there’s no one place that you can go to find out all the ins and outs of the music business.

Over the next couple of months TuneCore will be going out on the road visiting key cities around the UK to try and help address this. We’ll be holding an event in each city where you have an opportunity to come down and meet TuneCore face to face, as well as meeting other like minded musicians, and learning from some great speakers we have got lined up.

At each event we will be covering the basics of effectively distributing and promoting your music, as well as hearing from representatives from the Musicians’ Union as well as PRS, PPL and the MMF.

Here are the details of our first 2 events – just click on the link to go to the Eventbrite ticket page where you can book your free ticket<

April 22nd at Band On The Wall in Manchester

April 29th at Glee Club in Birmingham

Other dates including London and Nottingham to be announced soon so be sure to check back in a week or two!

We will also be at Sound City+ the conference strand of Liverpool Sound City, where you can book a one-on-one session with our UK Brand Manager to discuss recording and releasing music, promotional strategies and lots more.

To find out more about Liverpool Sound City please visit  http://www.tunecore.co.uk/liverpool

5 Things Artists Can Do to Build Their Network

[Editors Note: This blog was written by Rich Nardo. Rich is a freelance writer and editor, and is the co-founder of 24West a full-service creative agency focusing on music and tech.]

 

It doesn’t matter what industry you’re in or what aspirations you have for yourself professionally, at the end of the day you’re only as strong as your network. In the past, there was a bit of a stigma about artists being active in terms of connecting with music business professionals beyond playing shows and hoping their manager can get a label rep or two out to see them play. For a musician or band to be viewed as an “artist”, it had to appear they didn’t care how successful they were. The rule of thumb for creating a successful music career was to “get in the system without personally engaging in it”. As a result, a lot of artists ended up getting completely ripped off by said system or never truly reached their potential as a career musician because they felt it was ‘uncool’ to take matters into their own hands. Thankfully, those times are done.

In the 90s, we saw punk and hip hop bust open the door and show that you could be a ‘cred’ artist and still handle your business as a professional. One look at what Jay Z did with Rockafella or Brett Gurewitz (of Bad Religion) did with Epitaph (and all its subsidiaries) will put to bed the idea that real artists don’t involve themselves in the business of the business. In the subsequent years, this has trickled down to each level of artist; from Metallica finally gaining the rights to all their masters a few years ago to the bedroom producer running their own press and Spotify campaigns around their singles.

Here are five ways that independent artists can be more aggressive in taking their fate into their own hands:

1. Facebook and Linkedin Groups

Okay, so maybe involving yourself in Linkedin Groups is a little ambitious for most artists, but there are plenty of Music Business Networking groups on Facebook. I pull new contacts and valuable strategic information from these sorts of groups literally every day. While a lot of my personal favorite groups are invite only, there are plenty that are open for anyone to join. Start joining these groups first and gradually as your network grows you’ll gain access to some of the more exclusive ones. Same principle applies to Linkedin groups if you’re willing to delve into those waters as well.

2. Don’t Be Afraid to Cold Email

A lot of people are under the impression that it’ll be a waste of time to email the people they look up to, but doing so can lead to the biggest breaks you’re going to find. What’s important is to just do so with tact. Don’t email an A&R from your favorite label or the guitarist in that band you’ve been obsessed with lately to speak about yourself or ask a favor. Hit them up with specific questions and ask for advice that doesn’t require them to commit to anything. For example…do you really love a particular manager’s roster? Do they always seem to release music in the way you wish you did? Find a contact there and reach out.

Here’s a basic example of a way to reach out that may be fruitful for you:

Hey <artist manager>, my name is Rich and I am a songwriter. I currently play in a band called <band name>. We’re about to release our first record and I am really big fan of the way you roll out new singles with your roster. I was wondering if I could buy you a cup of coffee or shoot over a couple of questions via email to pick your brain a little bit if that’s okay? Thanks so much for your time and I look forward to hearing back from you!”.

3. Go To Networking Events

Same principle as the Facebook Networking Groups but in real life. If you live in a major city like Chicago, Austin, New York or Los Angeles there are ample such events you can find and attend. If you don’t, start your own group. It may be sparsely populated at first but it’ll grow over time. Also, keep in mind that when you’re first getting started these events are about quantity. When you’re starting out you should try to meet anybody and everybody in your city that is involved in the music industry. As you progress, you can hone in on those with events specifically for the bigger players.<

4. Embrace the Hashtag

There are certain hashtags that you should monitor and look to throw yourself into the resulting conversation on Twitter, for instance #MusicBiz. This is a great way to figure out what is currently trending in your professional world, engage others with the same goal and start establishing yourself as someone that people should take seriously. The same sort of success can be achieved by following music business professionals and engaging them in conversation around industry-related articles or thoughts that they post.

5. Collaborate!

A beautiful thing about a music ‘scene’, whether in real life or digitally, that often gets overlooked is the exposure to each others network. Whether you’re collaborating with another artist on a local show or tour, creating a networking group or writing/recording a song together, if you work together both of your networks will automatically double for the endeavor.

If you take a little time each day to dedicate to these suggestions, you will see incredible gains in terms of your understanding of the music business, as well as, the number of opportunities that are presented to you. Also, it puts you in a position where you have a lot more of the chips on your side of the table when the time is right to start talking to labels and managers about your project.

10 Ways to Make Vocals Sound Modern & Professional

[Editors Note: This is a guest blog written by Rob Mayzes, producer, mix engineer and founder of Home Studio Center, a site dedicated to providing valuable tips around recording from home studios.]

 

In most genres, the vocals are the most important part of the mix.

Especially in modern pop styles, there are a number of techniques that make a vocal sound modern, expensive and professional.

Once you apply these ten techniques, your mixes as a whole will improve.

1. Top-End Boost

This is perhaps the easiest and fastest way to make a vocal sound expensive.

Most boutique microphones have an exaggerated top-end. When using a more affordable microphone, you can simply boost the highs to replicate this characteristic.

The best way to do this is with an analogue modelling EQ, such as the free Slick EQ. Use a high shelf, and start with a 2dB boost at 10kHz.

Experiment with the frequency and amount of boost. You can go as low as 6kHz (but keep it subtle) and boost as much as 5dB above 10kHz. Just make sure it doesn’t become too harsh or brittle.

2. Use a De’Esser

When you start boosting the top-end, the vocal can start to sound more sibilant. To counteract this problem, a de’esser can be used.

These simple tools are a staple of the vocal mixing process, and required in at least 80% of cases. I find they usually work best at the very beginning or end of the plugin chain.

3. Remove Resonances

If you’re recording in a room that’s less than ideal, room resonances can quickly build up.

Find these resonances using the boost-and-sweep technique and then remove them with a narrow cut.

4. Control the Dynamics with Automation

For a modern sound, the dynamics of vocals need to be super consistent. Every word and syllable should be at roughly the same level.

Most of the time, this can’t be achieved with compression alone. Instead, use automation to manually level out the vocal.

I prefer to use gain automation to create consistency before the compressor. But regular volume automation works well too.

5. Catch the Peaks with a Limiter

Using a limiter after compression is another great way to control dynamics.

You don’t need to be aggressive with it (unless you are going for a heavily compressed sound). Aim for 2dB of gain reduction only on the loudest peaks.

6. Use Multiband Compression

As vocalists move between different registers, the tone of their voice can change. For example, when the vocalist moves to a lower register, their voice might start to sound muddy.

Instead of fixing this with EQ and removing the problematic frequencies from the entire performance, you could use multiband compression to control these frequencies only when they become problematic.

For any frequency-based problem that only appears on certain words or phrases, use multiband compression rather than EQ.

7. Enhance the Highs with Saturation

Sometimes EQ alone isn’t enough to enhance the top-end. By applying light saturation, you can create new harmonics and add more excitement.

8. Use Delays Instead of Reverb

For a modern sound, the vocals need to be upfront and in-your-face. Applying reverb to the vocal does the opposite of this, so is undesirable.

Instead, use a stereo slapback delay to create a space around the vocal and add some stereo width.

Use a low feedback (0-10%) and slightly different times on the left and right sides. I find that delay times between 50-200ms work best.

9. Try Adding a Subtle Plate Reverb

To add more width and depth to the vocal, try adding a subtle stereo plate on the vocal.

You don’t want the reverb to be noticeable, as discussed in the previous tip. Instead, bring the wetness up until you notice the reverb, then back it off a touch.

Start with the shortest decay time possible and a 60ms pre-delay to give the transients a bit more definition and room to breathe.

10. Try Adding a Subtle Chorus Effect

Another way to give the vocal a bit of depth and shimmer is to apply subtle chorusing.

Again, you don’t want the effect to be noticeable. Add a stereo chorus to the vocal and increase the wetness until you notice the effect, then back it off a touch.

Conclusion

The vocals are extremely important and will require more time mixing than most other instruments.

But once you apply the 10 techniques in this article, you can take a big step closer to a modern, professional sound.